Installation

HOW MUCH WATER DO YOU NEED?

The following tables list estimated amounts of water needed per day for a variety of home and farm uses. Figures represent requirements for MAXIMUM consumption during hot summer weather.

AROUND THE HOME AND FARM

Each person per day – all purposes: 50 gal
Each horse, dry cow or beef animal: 12 gal
Each milking cow: 35 gal
Each hog per day: 4 gal
Each sheep per day: 2 gal
Each 100 chickens per day: 4 gal

 

AVERAGE AMOUNT REQUIRED BY VARIOUS HOME AND YARD FIXTURES

Each shower bath: Up to 60 gal
To fill bathtub: 30 gal
To flush toilet: 6 gal
To fill lavatory: 2 gal
To sprinkle ¼” water on 1000 sq. feet of lawn: 160 gal
Dish Washing Machine – per load: 3 gal
Clothes Washing Machine – per load: Up to 50 gal

 

DETERMINING AMOUNT OF FLOW

The amount of flow your source offers can be measured fairly accurately by allowing water to run into a bucket of known volume (a one gallon bucket) while timing the rate of fill accurately to the nearest second. It may be necessary to build a small dam in the creek or spring to make it easier to catch water to fill the bucket. Keep in mind; the rate of flow from the source may less during drier times of the year. A 1″ ram needs a flow of 3 gallons per minute, while a 2″ ram may require 3 to 5 gallons per minute.

 

DETERMINING VERTICAL FALL

Having an adequate fall for the water from the source to the ram site is a very critical requirement. One of the easiest methods for calculating fall is to use a carpenter’s level fastened securely to the top of a board cut to a specified length…5 feet makes it easy to read. See diagram below:

DELIVERY RATES

PUMP SIZE GPM FALL LIFT DELIVERY
1 inch 3 2-15 feet 10-150 feet 100-2000 gallons per day
1.5 inch 3 2-15 feet 10-150 feet 200-3000 gallons per day
2 inch 3 2-15 feet 10-150 feet 200-4000 gallons per day

The above figures may vary depending upon each installation and location of the pump site.  The figures have been accomplished with actual field installations with proper setup and optimum conditions.

 

Horizontal distances are “almost” of no concern due to the slow volume of water being pumped.  There is an amount of “Surge Friction” at the head of the pump but nominal.  Distances of over 15,000 feet have been achieved with as little as 7 feet of fall, 26 feet of vertical lift with a 1-1/2″ pump delivering approximately 1,100 gal/day.

 

The optimum pumping ratio is generally considered as 3: 1. Meaning 3 feet of lift to every 1 foot of fall. The “maximum pumping” ratio is 10 to 1.

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